Java 9 features list

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Java 9 features – Java 9 was introduced to address a number of challenges that developers were facing when building applications with earlier versions of Java. Some of the specific issues that Java 9 was intended to address include:

  • The need to scale Java applications: As applications grew in size and complexity, it became increasingly difficult to manage their codebases and ensure that they remained maintainable and scalable. The Java Platform Module System (JPMS), which was introduced in Java 9, was designed to address these issues by providing a way to better organize and modularize code.
  • The need for improved performance: Java 9 introduced a number of performance improvements, including the ability to launch Java applications in a just-in-time (JIT) compiled mode and the introduction of the HTTP/2 client, which provided improved performance when making HTTP requests.
  • The need to support new programming paradigms: Java 9 introduced a new, reactive programming model called Flow, which made it easier to develop asynchronous and parallel applications.

Overall, Java 9 was intended to address a number of challenges that developers were facing when building Java applications, and to provide new tools and features that would make it easier for them to build modern, high-performance applications.

Java 9 was a significant release that introduced a number of new features and enhancements. Some of the notable features of Java 9 include:

Java Platform Module System (JPMS)

The Java Platform Module System (JPMS), also known as “Project Jigsaw,” was a major feature introduced in Java 9. It introduced the concept of modules to the Java platform, which are a way to organize code into self-contained units that can be easily shared and reused.

The JPMS provides a number of benefits to developers, including:

  • Improved maintainability: By organizing code into modules, it becomes easier to understand and maintain large codebases.
  • Better scalability: Modules can be loaded and unloaded dynamically, which allows applications to scale more easily.
  • Enhanced security: Modules can be configured to specify the specific dependencies that they need, which helps to reduce the risk of unintended dependencies and improve the security of applications.

Overall, the JPMS was designed to make it easier for developers to build and maintain large, complex applications on the Java platform.

New HTTP client API

Yes, that’s correct. Java 9 introduced a new HTTP client API that provides a modern and efficient way to send HTTP requests and receive responses. This new API replaces the older HttpURLConnection API that was used in previous versions of Java.

The new HTTP client API provides a number of benefits over the older HttpURLConnection API, including:

  • Improved performance: The new HTTP client API is designed to be more efficient and performant than the older HttpURLConnection API.
  • Support for HTTP/2: The new HTTP client API supports the HTTP/2 protocol, which provides improved performance and efficiency when making HTTP requests.
  • Reactive programming model: The new HTTP client API is designed to work with the reactive programming model introduced in Java 9, which makes it easier to develop asynchronous and parallel applications.

Overall, the new HTTP client API in Java 9 provides a more modern and efficient way for developers to send HTTP requests and receive responses in their Java applications.

Process API, which allows Java programs to more easily manage native processes.

Java 9 introduced a new process API that allows Java programs to more easily manage native processes. This new API provides a number of benefits to developers, including:

  • Improved support for native processes: The new process API provides a more robust and feature-complete way for Java programs to interact with native processes.
  • Enhanced control: The new process API provides more control over the execution of native processes, including the ability to redirect input and output streams and to specify environment variables.
  • Better error handling: The new process API provides improved error handling, including the ability to obtain the exit value of a process and to check for process completion.

Overall, the new process API in Java 9 provides a more powerful and flexible way for Java programs to manage native processes.

A new reactive streams API

Java 9 introduced a new reactive streams API as part of its support for reactive programming. Reactive programming is a programming paradigm that is focused on asynchronous and event-driven programming, and the reactive streams API provides a standard for building asynchronous, non-blocking stream processing applications with back pressure.

The reactive streams API consists of four main interfaces: Publisher, Subscriber, Subscription, and Processor. These interfaces provide a standard way for components of a reactive system to communicate and coordinate with each other.

The reactive streams API provides a number of benefits to developers, including:

  • Improved performance: By using non-blocking, asynchronous processing, applications built with the reactive streams API can scale more effectively and be more responsive to user input.
  • Better error handling: The reactive streams API provides mechanisms for handling errors and failures in a more controlled and consistent way.
  • Enhanced testing: The reactive streams API provides a standard way to test reactive components, making it easier to write unit and integration tests for reactive systems.

Overall, the reactive streams API in Java 9 provides a standard for building asynchronous, non-blocking stream processing applications with back pressure, and is an important part of Java’s support for reactive programming.

Enhanced support for multi-lingual Unicode strings

Java 9 introduced enhanced support for multi-lingual Unicode strings, including the ability to support Unicode 8.0. Unicode is a standardized encoding system that represents characters from most of the world’s written languages, and Unicode 8.0 is the latest version of the Unicode standard.

By supporting Unicode 8.0, Java 9 is able to represent a larger number of characters and symbols than previous versions of Java. This is particularly useful for developers working on applications that need to support a wide range of languages and scripts.

In addition to supporting Unicode 8.0, Java 9 also introduced a number of other enhancements to its support for multi-lingual Unicode strings, including:

  • Improved handling of supplementary characters: Java 9 provides improved support for supplementary characters, which are characters that are not represented in the basic 16-bit Unicode character set.
  • Enhanced string search capabilities: Java 9 introduced new string search capabilities that make it easier to search for and manipulate Unicode strings.

Overall, Java 9’s enhanced support for multi-lingual Unicode strings makes it easier for developers to build applications that support a wide range of languages and scripts.

New command-line interface (JShell)

Java 9 introduced a new command-line interface called JShell, which allows developers to evaluate expressions, declare variables, and define methods from the command line. JShell is designed to be an interactive tool that allows developers to quickly test code snippets and explore the Java language.

JShell provides a number of benefits to developers, including:

  • Improved productivity: JShell allows developers to quickly test code snippets and try out different ideas without having to create a full application.
  • Enhanced learning: JShell is a useful tool for learning the Java language, as it allows developers to experiment with different code snippets and see the results in real-time.
  • Better support for testing and debugging: JShell can be used to quickly test and debug code snippets, which can be useful when working on larger applications.

Overall, JShell is a useful tool that can help developers to be more productive and efficient when working with the Java language.

New version of the Java Plugin and Web Start

In Java 9, the Java Plugin and Web Start were removed from the Oracle JDK (Java Development Kit). The Java Plugin and Web Start were previously used to launch Java applets and Java Web Start applications in web browsers.

The decision to remove the Java Plugin and Web Start from the Oracle JDK was made because these technologies have become largely obsolete due to the increasing use of modern, browser-based technologies like HTML5 and JavaScript. As a result, the Java Plugin and Web Start were no longer needed and were removed from the Oracle JDK.

However, it’s important to note that the Java Plugin and Web Start are still available in the OpenJDK (Open Java Development Kit), which is an open-source version of the Java platform. If you need to use the Java Plugin or Web Start, you can still do so by using the OpenJDK.

Overall, Java 9 was a significant update to the Java platform that provided a number of new tools and features that were designed to make it easier for developers to build modern, high-performance applications.

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